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Filtering Foods That Clean Up Our Waters

An increased need for innovative measures

Water quality has an impact on our environment, health, and economy. As every major bay, estuary, and harbor on Long Island is at risk, scientists have been working to determine new ways that can help address what continues to grow as a local and national crisis. For years, oysters have been thought of as a possible solution in some areas to help clean up our waters. But, these filter feeding bivalves, which have a tremendous benefit to the local economy, have also fallen victim to worsening water quality. Experimenting with a new aquaculture crop, Stony Brook University researchers and local farmers are beginning to harvest sugar kelp that had been planted in Moriches Bay this past winter and testing the waters for results.

Great Gun Shellfish Company owner Paul McCormick is an oyster farmer by trade whose farm filters millions of gallons of water daily. What he and researchers are looking into is if cultivating sugar kelp will help with oyster growing as well as filtering the estuary. This also offers the potential for oyster farmers to diversify their crop as it is a trending food source.

In a recent Newsday story, Dr. Chris Gobler said “cultivating the native seaweed also has environmental benefits. The crop sequesters nitrogen and phosphorous, and also captures carbon dioxide. Higher levels of carbon dioxide can lead to the acidification of waters, which can harm shellfish production. ‘We think the aquaculture of seaweeds represents another important tool for improving water quality on Long Island,’ he said. About 3 percent of the kelp is nitrogen.”

Looking into new aquaculture farming methods is just one of many ways people are working to slow the trend of nitrogen pollution and toxic algae blooms in Long Island’s water. Alternative wastewater treatment systems and Reclaim Our Waters' septic improvement program incentives can help fund these replacements for homeowners. Proposals for groundwater monitoring laws for mines is another way environmentalists, scientists, civic groups, and the public are taking action. You can help, too! Making simple changes at home, contacting elected officials, and joining the Long Island Clean Water Partnership can have a positive impact. Become a member today!